Emoji leading to alarming decline in English skills

Nearly half of British adults are not confident with their grammar and spelling, YouTube research found.
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A new study found that Emoji is the fastest-growing language in history.

A new study found that Emoji is the fastest-growing language in history.

Emoji is the fastest-growing language in history that is ruining young people's English skills, a new study has revealed.

According to The Telegraph, Google owned YouTube commissioned a study of adults aged between 16 and 65. Of the 2,000 people the study surveyed, ninety-four percent of the respondents agreed with the statement, with four out of five saying young people were the worst culprits. This translates to nearly everyone in the video sharing website concurring with the result.

The report reveals that nearly three quarters of adults in Britain now depend on the character icons to communicate with each other.

The report reveals that nearly three quarters of adults in Britain now depend on the character icons to communicate with each other.

The report reveals that nearly three quarters of adults in Britain now depend on the character icons to communicate with each other while depending heavily on spellchecks and predictive text to write. Likewise, the report indicates that young people are also the victims of the picture characters as their dependence on them have touched astronomical proportions of nearly six billion times a day.

Unsurprisingly, it has been described as the fastest growing language ever. Even Oxford Dictionaries named the 😂 face with tears of joy emoji as its word of the year. However, Dr Ella Glikson, an expert in business and management at Negev's Ben-Gurion University in Israel, told the London-based publication that the “research shows using emojis in the workplace does not increase perceptions of warmth, and actually decrease perceptions of competence.”

Conversely, another study, conducted by scientists at the University of Edinburgh looked at picture icons from a different lens and found that the inclusion of diverse emojis helped to promote representation and personal expression on social media.

When iPhone maker Apple introduced the emoji options that featured emojis with darker skin tones, and with different colour hair in 2015, there were fears that the icons could be used inappropriately or abusively, and could even fuel racial tensions. But when researchers examined a sample of over one billion tweets to determine the ways in which people used the emojis, they were surprised to find that the picture characters with adapted skin tones were used positively and are rarely abused.

"The introduction of skin tone choices for emojis has been a success in representing diversity, and their extensive use shows that they meet a real demand from users,” said the lead researcher for the study Dr. Walid Magdy, in a statement.