Net Neutrality is dead

The FCC approved Ajit Pai’s proposal to kill net neutrality on Thursday.
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The FCC’s efforts to kill net neutrality have finally been successful.

The FCC’s efforts to kill net neutrality have finally been successful.

The FCC’s efforts to kill net neutrality have finally been successful. In a 302 vote on Thursday, the Federal Communications Commission approved Ajit Pai’s proposed measures, thereby removing the net neutrality rules put in place by the Obama administration. 

"The main problem consumers have with the Internet is not and has never been that their Internet provider is blocking access to content. It’s been that they don’t have access at all.” - Ajit Pai

Paid said the rollback of the net neutrality rules would eventually help all consumers since service providers such as Comcast and AT&T could offer users far more greater variety of service options. The earlier rules used to prevent ISPs from throttling or blocking Internet traffic or providing fast lanes for their own, or preferred services.

"The Internet wasn’t broken in 2015," said Ajit Pai

"The Internet wasn’t broken in 2015," said Ajit Pai

With today’s vote, Title II designation has been removed, meaning Facebook can’t use tougher net neutrality rules even if it somehow wanted to, not that it will as long as Ajit Pai is in position. According to the new rules, Internet service providers can block services, throttle specific service providers and even prioritize certain content if they wanted to. They can do all that as long as they’re informing the public that they’re doing so.

“The Internet wasn’t broken in 2015. We were not living in some digital dystopia. The main problem consumers have with the Internet is not and has never been that their Internet provider is blocking access to content. It’s been that they don’t have access at all,” said Ajit Pai, chairman of the FCC. 

Nonetheless, a significant section of the consumers and companies favour the new move.

Critics say Pai’s rule could cause much more harm than just lack of content access. But nonetheless, there is a significant section of the consumers and companies that favour the  new move. The changes are not likely to go into effect immediately but may take some time, probably even a few week for the repeal to go into effect, so users will not see any of the potential changes immediately.