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FCC’s proposal to end net neutrality is now ready - TechSource International - Leaders in Technology News

FCC’s proposal to end net neutrality is now ready

The FCC wants to allow ISPs to block apps, preferentially treat services etc.
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The final draft of the FCC's proposal to take down net neutrality is now complete.

The final draft of the FCC's proposal to take down net neutrality is now complete.

The final draft of the Federal Communications Commission's (FCC) proposal to take down net neutrality is now complete. The organisation released the draft yesterday and it seems the FCC plans to get rid of pretty much every net neutrality rules. 

Under the new proposal, ISPs will be free to allow fast and slow speeds on their networks. They will even be able to prioritise traffic from their own services and block applications they do not want on their network. However, ISPs will still have to disclose all of these things whenever they do it

"Repealing these regulations will create jobs, increase competition, and lead to better, faster, cheaper Internet access for all Americans."  - FCC's Chief Ajit Pai

"Repealing these regulations will create jobs, increase competition, and lead to better, faster, cheaper Internet access for all Americans."  - FCC's Chief Ajit Pai

In fact, it seems that’s pretty much all they will really have to do. According to the new proposal, the net neutrality rulings from 2015 are “misguided and legally flawed approach”. The proposal calls that ruling incorrect, erred and says it came to “erroneous conclusions”. The new proposals will apparently “facilitate critical broadband investment and innovation by removing regulatory uncertainty and lowering compliance costs”.

“The transparency requirement we adopt, together with antitrust and consumer protection laws, ensures that consumers have means to take remedial action if an ISP engages in behaviour inconsistent with an open Internet,” the FCC states in the proposal.

Meanwhile, Ajit Pai, head of America's communications watchdog via an online post said, "Repealing these regulations will create jobs, increase competition, and lead to better, faster, cheaper Internet access for all Americans," Pai said. "My view is that the Internet should be run by engineers and entrepreneurs, not lawyers and bureaucrats."