Apple co-founder Steve Wozniack deletes Facebook account

Expressing concerns over the carelessness with which Facebook handles private information of users.
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Apple co-founder Steve Wozniak told USA TODAY that he has deleted his Facebook account.

Apple co-founder Steve Wozniak told USA TODAY that he has deleted his Facebook account.

Apple co-founder Steve Wozniak told USA TODAY that he has deleted his Facebook account citing concerns over the carelessness with which the platform handles private information of users.

In an email to USA Today, Wozniak said Facebook makes its profit off of users’ private information, but none of that profit is returned to them. "Users provide every detail of their life to Facebook and ... Facebook makes a lot of advertising money off this," he wrote. "The profits are all based on the user’s info, but the users get none of the profits back."

Wozniak compared Facebook’s money-making tactics to that of iPhone maker. “Apple makes its money off of good products, not off of you,” Wozniak said. Later, while also taking a shot at Search giant Google, he suggested that all Facebook as well as Google's users are treated as products. Wozniak said he’d rather pay than have his “personal information exploited for advertising”. Conversely, he applauded Apple over its commitment to user privacy. 

Before deleting his Facebook account on Sunday, the former Apple co-founder posted a message to his 5,000 friends on the platform. “I am in the process of leaving Facebook. It’s brought me more negatives than positives. Apple has more secure ways to share things about yourself. I can still deal with old school email and text messages,” he wrote.

In an interview late Monday to the Associated Press (AP), Wozniak said he had been thinking of deleting his account for some time and finally deleted his account after some of his trusted friends deleted their Facebook accounts. It’s “a big hypocrisy not respecting my privacy when Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg buys all the houses around his and all the lots around his in Hawaii for his own privacy,” Wozniak said. “He knows the value of it, but he’s not looking after mine.”

Wozniak’s move comes in the midst of the social media giant’s deepest crisis, a data breach that has allegedly affected 87 million users globally, thanks to political consultancy firm Cambridge Analytica that purportedly accessed personal data of users globally through an app-based game.